Index on Censorship: Flemming Rose responds to the University of Cape Town

“…I find it disgraceful that the Vice-Chancellor Mr. Max Price puts the blame on me instead of taking responsibility for his decision. He is afraid that some people might react in certain ways to my presence. That’s not my responsibility. If they choose to act in a way that concerns the VC, it’s their decision, not mine. The VC has to hold them responsible for their actions, not me. It’s the heckler’s veto. Mr. Price talks about “the harm that unlimited freedom of expression could cause.” I don’t know any person including myself who is in favor of unlimited free speech, that’s a caricature of free speech activists. What I oppose is the kind of “I am in favor of free speech, but”-position that Mr. Price provides a classic example of. His approach to free speech would make it possible to ban any speech…”
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Index on Censorship condemns decision to axe Flemming Rose as speaker on academic freedom

“…Index on Censorship is appalled by the decision by the University of Cape Town to rescind an invitation to Danish editor Flemming Rose to deliver the annual TB Davie lecture on academic freedom – especially at a time when academic freedom is under threat around the world – and considering recent events in Turkey.
Rose, the editor responsible for publishing controversial cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed in the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten in 2005, was invited last year to give the August 2016 lecture, which UCT describes as a “flagship lecture to promote academic freedom and freedom of speech” and which is organised by the university’s academic freedom committee.
However, in a letter sent by UCT Vice-Chancellor Max Price on 12 July, Price tells the committee that the university executive had decided “it would be extremely unwise to proceed with the address.”
What follows in the letter is an attempt by Price to justify a decision that makes a mockery of the university’s supposed defence of free speech and academic freedom.”
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The College Fix: Disinviting a controversial speaker is academic freedom

“…War is peace, freedom is slavery, and disinviting a controversial speaker is academic freedom.
South Africa’s University of Cape Town is drawing international condemnation from freedom-of-expression groups for yanking back a speaking invitation to Flemming Rose, the former editor of the Danish newspaper that published cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed in 2005.
In a July 12 letter to the university’s Academic Freedom Committee, which organizes its annual lecture on academic freedom, Vice Chancellor Max Price says UCT must nix Rose as the lecture speaker…”
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Flemming Rose Receives the 2016 Milton Friedman Prize for Advancing Liberty

Flemming Rose, Danish journalist and author of The Tyranny of Silence, is the recipient of the 2016 Milton Friedman Prize for Advancing Liberty. In 2005, Rose, then an editor at the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten, sparked worldwide controversy when he commissioned and published 12 cartoons meant to depict the prophet Muhammad. The illustrations, intended to draw attention to the issue of self-censorship and the threat that intimidation poses to free speech, provoked deadly chaos in the Islamic world and put Rose in the center of a global debate about the limits to free speech in the 21st century.

The Milton Friedman Prize for Advancing Liberty, named in honor of perhaps the greatest champion of liberty in the 20th century, is presented every other year to an individual who has made a significant contribution to advance human freedom.
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WSJ: Notable & Quotable - The Milton Friedman Prize

“We need a noninstrumental or nonutilitarian argument for free speech. Freedom of speech is a good in and of itself. It has intrinsic value.”
From remarks by Danish journalist Flemming Rose upon receiving the Cato Institute’s Milton Friedman Prize for Advancing Liberty…”
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Publishers Weekly: PICTURE OF THE DAY


Rose Accepts Milton Friedman Prize Flemming Rose (l.), Danish journalist and author of ‘The Tyranny of Silence,’ receives the 2016 Milton Friedman Prize for Advancing Liberty from former ACLU president Nadine Strossen on May 25 at New York’s Waldorf-Astoria. The $250,000 award, given bi-annually by the Cato Institute, is presented every other year to an individual who has made a significant contribution to advance human freedom. Credit: Brendan O’Hara


“Free expression is in danger across the globe. Protestors who are offended by the ideas of others have a chilling effect on the publication and dissemination of speech — and some of those protests aim for a violent suppression of ideas they don’t like. Danish journalist Flemming Rose found himself at the center of controversy in 2005 after the newspaper he worked for at the time, Jyllands-Posten, published a set of editorial cartoons depicting the Islamic prophet Muhammad. His recent book, The Tyranny of Silence: How One Cartoon Ignited a Global Debate on the Future of Free Speech, recounts that period and explains why it’s important to take an active role in defending the right to speak and publish. For his work advancing the cause of free speech, the Cato Institute has awarded Rose the 2016 Milton Friedman Prize for Advancing Liberty, presented on May 25 at the Waldorf-Astoria in New York City.”
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National Review: A Danish journalist stands up to attempts to suppress unpopular opinions

“Both around the world and here at home, free speech is under assault. From the Charlie Hebdo massacre in Paris to the “unexplained” deaths of critics of Russian president Vladimir Putin, people who express unpopular opinions or report the truth are in danger. Worldwide, more than 110 journalists were killed in 2015, bringing the total to 787 since 2005, according to Reporters without Borders. The threats to free speech in this country don’t rise to that level, of course. But Hillary Clinton wants to change the First Amendment to limit political speech, and Donald Trump wants to rewrite libel laws so that he can sue media critics. Meanwhile, colleges routinely punish those who take unpopular stands and reject speakers who might challenge student orthodoxy. That’s one reason why it is significant that the Cato Institute will award the eighth biennial Milton Friedman Prize for Advancing Liberty to a true champion of free speech, the Danish journalist and author Flemming Rose. Rose came to the world’s attention in 2005, when, as an editor at the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten, he published a series of twelve cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad. Rose did so, not because he sought to be offensive, he said, but to challenge the growing wave of “self-censorship in Europe caused by widening fears and feelings of intimidation in dealing with issues related to Islam.”
Read more Flemming Rose discusses freedom of speech on FBN’s Kennedy

Flemming Rose discusses freedom of speech on FBN’s Kennedy
Watch the video Denmark sacrifices free speech in the name of fighting terror

“…In Denmark, as in Europe more generally, there is a serious lack of confidence in the power of free speech to cope with ideological threats to a free and democratic society. According to an opinion poll in Jyllands-Posten, 55 percent of Danes are in favor of criminalizing religious speech that is seen as undermining Danish values.
Denmark’s Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen made it clear that he plans to criminalize speech that goes against Danish law. This latest initiative breaks with 70 years of fighting extreme ideologies without curtailing civil liberties.
There were calls to ban Nazism after World War II, and the Danish government considered censoring a Communist daily paper and limiting the speech of Communists during the Cold War. In both cases, the government backed down and Denmark’s strong democratic institutions and a vibrant civil society prevailed.
Of course, criminalizing religious hate preachers’ anti-democratic speech and denying them access to the country will not turn Denmark into a repressive dictatorship. What it will do, however, is blur one of the crucial distinctions between a liberal democracy and a dictatorship…”
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The Times of Israel: Flemming Rose Awarded Prize for Advancing Liberty

“In his superb book, The Tyranny of Silence, Mr. Rose recounts the backstory and global fallout of the “cartoons crisis.” Despite widespread criticism, intimidation, and death threats — he has been featured on an Al Qaeda hit list — Mr. Rose refused to apologize for the decision to publish the cartoons. And he continues to be outspoken about the vital importance of freedom of speech — a principle that I and my colleagues at the Ayn Rand Institute regard as essential to a free society.

The Milton Friedman Award is presented by the Cato Institute, and kudos the members of the committee for their selection. I hope the prize brings greater attention to Flemming Rose’s work and particularly his book. He’s one of my intellectual heroes, and I was delighted by the news of this award.”
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The Atlantic: The Reluctant Fundamentalist

“Flemming Rose is a marked man. To his liberal-left detractors, he is a bigoted Islamophobe, stirring up racial and religious hatred against an already embattled minority. To his defenders, he is a brave and unflinching advocate of Enlightenment values. To his jihadist persecutors, he is a blaspheming infidel fit for slaughter.
With all that symbolic baggage freighted to him, it’s easy to forget that Rose is actually a living, breathing human being, whose interior world can no more be reduced to an abstract noun than a person’s life story can be written on a postcard…”
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“(NCTG) “Chủ nghĩa Hồi giáo với thế giới Phương Tây sẽ là một thách thức, tuy nhiên không nên quá sợ hãi” - nhà báo Flemming Rose, người đang bị truy đuổi và phải sống từ hàng chục năm nay dưới sự che chở của cảnh sát vì đã cho đăng những tranh biếm họa về Đấng tiên tri Muhammad…”
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Yle Forum: Free speech in Finland

“Flemming Rose, Jyllands-Postenin ulkomaantoimituksen päällikkö, on ensimmäistä kertaa puhumassa Suomessa. Työskennellessään Jyllands-Postenin kulttuuripäätoimittajana vuonna 2005, Rose tilasi 40 pilapiirtäjältä profeetta Muhammadia esittäviä pilapiirroksia kokeillakseen, miten islaminuskoisten läsnäolo Tanskassa vaikuttaa sananvapauteen. Kaksitoista pilakuvaa julkaistiin Jyllands-Postenissa 30.9.2005, jonka jälkeen kohu levisi ensin Tanskassa ja myöhemmin maailmanlaajuisesti, kun ulkomaiset lehdet alkoivat myös julkaista pilakuvia. Mikä sai hänet tekemään julkaisupäätöksen, mitä siitä seurasi ja miten Rose nyt näkee sananvapauden ja oman vastuunsa?”
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Presentation at Global Conference on "The Fate of Freedom of Expression in Liberal Democracies" Wellesley College, October 1-3 2015

The Freedom Project at Wellesley College is dedicated to the exploration of the idea of freedom in all of its manifestations, but especially in the tradition of Western classical liberalism. This tradition, in its broadest sense, emphasizes the sanctity of individual rights, freedom of contract and economic rights, constitutional democracy, and the rule of law. It includes, as well, an appreciation of the spirit of individualism, the free marketplace of ideas  and the struggle against arbitrary power, both in the form of political domination and the stultifying influence of ideological dogmas – cultural, political or religious – and social conformity.
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